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Fillings in baby teeth

Why fill a baby tooth that is going to fall out?

Some baby teeth don’t fall out until your child is 12 years old. A tooth that needs to be filled could be one of those. Broken and infected teeth can affect your child’s health and self-confidence. To fill the tooth, the dentist will remove the cavity and ‘fill’ the tooth with metal, plastic or another material. A filling may be an easy and inexpensive way to alleviate a problem that, if left untreated, could cause pain and require costly treatment. It can prevent the cavity from affecting the tooth any further.

If the tooth is not filled and the cavity grows, the tooth might have to be pulled. If that is the case, your child might need to wear a spacer to leave room for the permanent tooth to come in. When a baby tooth is missing, the teeth around it could move into the space and prevent the permanent tooth from growing. To keep the space open, your dentist may fit a plastic or metal spacer on the adjacent teeth.

The informative zone

Helpful hints from Dr. Bertrand

Good oral health starts here!

This section provides a wide range of accurate information for all our current and future clients.

You’ll find:

  • New patient form
  • Online bookings
  • General information on dental health
  • Post-treatment care instructions

Our team looks forward to welcoming you with open arms and a bright smile. We’re located on Lacordaire Boulevard and the clinic is open Monday to Friday. We offer extended hours to make scheduling a little easier for you and your family.

Thank you for choosing Clinique dentaire Christian Bertrand.

Les formulaires

Health Questionnaire

To get a head start, you can complete a form that details your health status before your first appointment at the clinic:
Download the form (PDF format)

  • Save the form on your computer before filling it out.
  • DO NOT FILL IT OUT DIRECTLY FROM YOUR WEB BROWSER
  • Fill out and print the form.
  • Bring the form to the first appointment OR

Should you need to cancel your appointment, please notify us by phone or email at least 48 working hours in advance, otherwise you will have to pay a service fee.

Make an appointment

To make an appointment, please call us at 514 322-4250 or fill out the form below.

We will confirm your appointment (by phone call or email) or offer you a different appointment time within 24 hours.

If this is your first appointment with us, click here to open your medical file.








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We care about the quality of our services. That’s why we have prepared a short patient survey to measure your level of satisfaction and let us know what needs improving. Your answers will remain anonymous.



Section des patients

Fillings in baby teeth

Why fill a baby tooth that is going to fall out?

Some baby teeth don’t fall out until your child is 12 years old. A tooth that needs to be filled could be one of those. Broken and infected teeth can affect your child’s health and self-confidence. To fill the tooth, the dentist will remove the cavity and ‘fill’ the tooth with metal, plastic or another material. A filling may be an easy and inexpensive way to alleviate a problem that, if left untreated, could cause pain and require costly treatment. It can prevent the cavity from affecting the tooth any further.

If the tooth is not filled and the cavity grows, the tooth might have to be pulled. If that is the case, your child might need to wear a spacer to leave room for the permanent tooth to come in. When a baby tooth is missing, the teeth around it could move into the space and prevent the permanent tooth from growing. To keep the space open, your dentist may fit a plastic or metal spacer on the adjacent teeth.

Oral and dental health in children over two years old

Although it is not obvious when to stop the habit of sucking a thumb or a pacifier, we strongly suggest explaining to your children around age 3 that they should stop this practice.

Between ages 2 and 6, we recommend closely monitoring how your children brush their teeth, to ensure that the technique adopted is suitable. If you want to use fluoridated toothpaste, do not exceed a dose of 500 ppm. For children over six years old, a 1000 ppm fluoridated toothpaste may be indicated, depending on your dentist’s recommendation.

In addition, pay special attention to the teeth located at the back of the dental arcade, because they are often neglected during brushing. Since children between ages 6 and 13 are more subject to the development of tooth decay in the molars and premolars, the application of a dental sealant is often the best solution to prevent infiltration of bacteria via the furrows present on the occlusal surface.

The first visit of your child

It is recommended that your child visit the dentist for the first time at around age two.

At the first appointment, the dentist and dental hygienist will put your child at ease, examine and clean their teeth and review brushing and flossing techniques with you.

It is estimated that 50% of the general public is afraid of dentists. It is important for parents not to transmit this fear to their children. Information and a positive attitude will reassure your children and determine their attitude in the future. Your collaboration is important before, during and after the visit.

Before the first visit

  • Read your child one of the many books featuring a character who visits the dentist for the first time.
  • Explain what the dentist will do.
  • Go over the steps of the visit the day before the appointment.
  • Never tell a child that going to the dentist will never hurt.

During the visit

  • You may be asked to sit in the dentist’s chair and hold your child during the examination.
  • If your child is older, you may be asked to return to the waiting room once the initial contact is made.
  • Listen to the instructions and suggestions you are given on how to care for your child’s teeth.
  • Keep a positive attitude about the appointment at all times.
  • Ask for another appointment in six months.

After the visit

  • Make sure that your child brushes her teeth at least twice a day or after every meal.
  • Floss your child’s teeth once a day.
  • Monitor what your child eats and offer foods that have a low sugar content.
  • Till the age of 10, make sure your child brushes his teeth before bedtime.

The importance of regular dental checkups

Regular visits to the dentist are indispensable to preserve the health of our teeth and gums. We generally recommend scheduling an appointment every six months.

The routine checkup looks for the presence of tooth decay, dental plaque or tartar on the teeth. Dental plaque is a whitish deposit that adheres to the surface of the teeth. Mainly composed of bacteria, it hardens and is transformed into tartar if it is not eliminated in a timely manner. Unfortunately, at this stage, only a dental professional can solve the problem. If you neglect to do so, various problems threaten to appear sooner or later.

The second stage of the checkup is to examine the gums with an instrument to measure the space between the teeth and the gums. If this space is minimal, this means your gums are doing well. On the other hand, if the space is more pronounced, inflammation is present. Of course, this examination accounts for each patient’s special conditions (eating habits, smoking, saliva characteristics, diabetes, etc.). Oral cancer detection tests are also available.

Coin des petits

Suivi de traitements À la maison

Crown or Bridge Delivery

It is important to follow the instructions below to speed healing. Note that some discomfort and swelling are normal after the treatment.

The installation of crowns and bridges usually takes two appointments to complete. During the first appointment, we take impressions of the teeth that are to be replaced. Then temporary crowns or bridges are installed to protect your teeth until the custom restoration is being made.

Day of surgery

  • Take the medication prescribed or recommended by our team, as needed.

Don’ts

  • Don’t consume hot beverages when you are frozen.
  • Don’t eat hard or sticky foods (candy, chewing gum).

Food

  • Try to eat on the opposite side.

The day after until full healing

  • Brush your teeth normally, but floss carefully to avoid dislodging the temporary crown.
  • If a temporary crown comes off, you will have to come back in so we can re-cement it. This is important as it will prevent other teeth from moving and compromising the fit of your final restoration.

If you experience pain or have trouble closing your mouth, or if you have any questions, call us at 514 322-4250.

Tooth Extraction

It is important to follow the instructions below to speed healing. Note that some discomfort and swelling are normal after surgery.

Day of surgery

  • Keep the compresses in your mouth for one to two hours, applying firm pressure. Change the pads every half hour, as needed.
  • Keep your head elevated at all times.
  • Apply ice to your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes of ice every hour).
  • If bleeding occurs, bite down on a gauze pad or lightly moistened tea bag for 20 minutes.
  • Bleeding and coloured saliva are normal postoperative effects.
  • Limit your physical activity. Rest.

Don’ts

  • Don’t dislodge the blood clot that has formed as it helps with the healing process.
  • Don’t eat anything before the bleeding stops.
  • Don’t drink through a straw.
  • Don’t rinse your mouth or spit.
  • Don’t smoke or drink alcohol.
  • Don’t eat hard foods.
  • Don’t brush near the area of the extracted tooth for the first 72 hours.

Pain

  • If the pain causes you discomfort, take the medication you were prescribed.
  • If you were prescribed antibiotics for this treatment, continue to take them for the specified time period even if the symptoms are gone.

Food

  • Eat only soft foods or lukewarm liquids the day of the extraction. Resume your normal eating habits as soon as you are able.

The day after until full healing

  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a warm salt water solution (2 ml or ½ tsp of salt in 250 ml or 1 cup of water).
  • Brush your teeth and floss daily to remove plaque and ensure the best long-term results. Don’t brush near the area of the extracted tooth for the first 72 hours.
  • Avoid hard foods (nuts, candy, ice).
  • You may have trouble speaking and produce extra saliva. This should subside in a week.
  • There may be some bruising on the skin. This will disappear in five to seven days.
  • You may have trouble opening your mouth. This should diminish in four to five days.
  • If the pain increases after three days, call our office.

You will feel better after a few days and can resume your normal activities. If you experience heavy bleeding, pain, continued swelling for two to three days or a negative reaction to the medication, call us at 514 322-4250.

Minor Oral Surgery

Some dental treatments may be covered by your insurance plan. Please bring your forms or identity card with you to your appointment. We would be pleased to submit your insurance claims to participating companies.

It is important to follow the instructions below to speed healing. Note that some discomfort and swelling are normal after surgery.

Day of surgery

  • Keep the compresses in your mouth for one to two hours, applying firm pressure. Change the pads every half hour, as needed.
  • Apply ice to your cheek at regular intervals (20 minutes of ice every hour).
  • If bleeding occurs, bite down on a gauze pad or lightly moistened tea bag for 20 minutes.

Don’ts

  • Don’t rinse your mouth or spit.
  • Don’t drink through a straw.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Don’t consume hot foods or beverages. Eat cold, soft foods.
  • Don’t engage in intense activity.

Pain

  • For pain relief in the first 24 to 72 hours, take acetaminophen (Tylenol, Atasol), ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or the medication you were prescribed. Don’t take aspirin.

The day after until full healing

  • Rinse your mouth three times a day with a warm salt water solution (2 ml or ½ tsp of salt in 250 ml or 1 cup of water).
  • There may be some bruising on the skin. This will disappear in five to seven days.
  • You may have trouble opening your mouth. This should diminish in four to five days.
  • If the pain increases after three days, call our office.

You will feel better after a few days and can resume your normal activities. If you experience heavy bleeding, pain, continued swelling for two to three days or a negative reaction to the medication, call us at 514 322-4250.